Daily Conference call schedule; Dial in to ask immigration related questions.

Conference dial-in number: (760) 569-7676

Participant access code: 977835

November 20th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
November 20th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
November 21th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)

November 24th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
November 24th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
November 25th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
November 25th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
November 26th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes) 
November 26th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes) (CANCELLED)

December 1st at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 1st at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 2nd at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 2nd at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 3rd at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 3rd at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 4th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 4th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 5th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 5th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)

December 8th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 8th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 9th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 9th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 10th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 10th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 11th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 11th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 12th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 12th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)

December 15th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 15th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 16th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 16th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 17th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 17th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 18th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 18th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 19th at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 19th at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)

December 22nd at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 22nd at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 23rd at 11:30 AM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)
December 23rd at 3:30 PM (Central time) (expected to last 30 minutes)

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Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is a boutique business immigration law firm based in Houston, Texas. For over 15 years, our firm has successfully represented corporate clients across the nation in their efforts to bring foreign workers and business professionals to the United States. Our expertise on immigration issues such as changes of status, H-1B transfers, EB-3 to EB-2 conversion, and I-140 petition educational equivalency is available free of charge to participants in our conference call as each day one of our experienced team of immigration lawyers in Houston & Dallas advises clients on these and a host of other issues. Join us and experience how the skilled attorneys at Reddy & Neumann, P.C. can provide you with efficient answers to your immigration questions.

By Rahul Reddy & Emily Neumann, Attorneys at Law, www.rnlawgroup.com; This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

The Employment-Based Immigration system by which U.S. companies seek top talent globally is just as broken as border security, yet it gets little attention in the current immigration debate. Legal immigration is a highly regulated and tightly controlled bureaucratic system that should serve our national interest by providing U.S. employers with access to workers with the specific skills necessary to strengthen the economy and remain competitive in the global economy. Immigration laws need to be revised to ensure that American businesses have access to essential workers without having to overcome the current hurdles, such as:

Up To 18-month Delay to Hire H-1B Worker:

Congress has limited the number of new H-1B visas available each year to only 65,000, a number that was reached within only 5 days this past April. Even the additional 20,000 that are exempt from the cap for U.S. master’s degree holders were used up immediately. This has led to an 18-month hiatus for businesses that must wait from April 2013 untilOctober 1, 2014 to employ an H-1B worker who did not make this year’s cut. If this year is any indication of what is to come, even after waiting up to 18 months, an employer must hope that the worker gets selected in the lottery because there are not enough slots for all of the applications filed. The H-1B cap should be immediately raised to 180,000 and future years should allow for additional increases to keep in line with demand.

Inconsistent Adjudications:

In addition to getting past the hurdle created by the unreasonably low number of visas available, inconsistency between adjudications creates doubt as to whether an H-1B petition will actually be approved. An employer may file two almost identical petitions and one will be approved while the other is denied. When a legitimate petition is denied, the business can lose up to $8,000 or more in filing fees and attorney fees. This does not include the cost of lost business due to the company’s inability to hire a key worker for a new project. Clear standards for adjudication should be set forth allowing legitimate employers to have a sense of certainty that an application for a needed worker will be approved.

Burdensome Documentation Requirements:

Small-to medium-sized businesses are often requested to submit voluminous documentation to establish eligibility, which is overly burdensome and creates additional cost. Recently, a U.S. employer with over 150 employees in almost all 50 States was required to submit Quarterly Wage Reports filed with each State for the past 9 quarters. The stack of documents was so excessive that a large box had to be couriered to the immigration office. Documentation requests should be limited to those that are relevant without being excessive. Also, further restrictions and red-tape in the H-1B visa application process should be avoided. The USCIS Site Visit program does an excellent job of ferreting out businesses that misuse the H-1B visa. Adding additional filing requirements and compliance steps would make it more difficult for small- to medium-sized businesses to compete in the global economy.

Wasted Green Cards:

From 1992 to the present over 400,000 green cards went unused due to processing delays and the per-country cap. This waste should be remedied by allowing these immigrant visas to be used to reduce the current backlogs.

Spouses and Children are Needlessly Counted Towards the Green Card Cap:

Each year, approximately 80,000 of the 140,000 employment-based green cards available are issued to spouses and children of the sponsored worker. This creates additional backlog for the actual workers being sponsored. For example, a professional with his wife and two children currently draws down four green cards from a given employment-based immigration category. The law should be changed such that only a single green card, one for the primary applicant, would count against the quota.

Per Country Cap is Discriminatory:

Under the current system, 140,000 employment-based green cards are allotted for foreign nationals and, these green cards are distributed equally among all countries, with a 7% quota set for each country. These parameters have resulted in backlogs for individuals coming from high-demand countries like India, even when the overall cap has not been reached. A professional from India holding a master’s degree currently must wait almost 9 years to obtain a green card. The wait is even longer for bachelor’s degree holders or skilled workers. The per-country cap is discriminatory and should be eliminated so that all individuals are on an even playing field regardless of the country of origin. If an employer finds a talented worker, the question of the worker's country of birth should be irrelevant.

Discouraging Entrepreneurship and Innovation:

More than 40% of the 2010 Fortune 500 companies were founded by immigrants or their children. However, long backlogs and the inability to access green cards results in talent leaving the country. The immigration system should be reformed to promote entrepreneurship and award achievement.

 

Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is an immigration law firm in Houston, Texas. For over 15 years, our firm has successfully represented corporate clients across the United States in their efforts to bring foreign workers and business professionals to the United States. Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is highly experienced in working with employment-based visas, adjustment of status, green cards, and PERM labor certification. From filing, through approval, and on to appeal, we do everything possible to ensure that your company can bring the best and brightest in the world to the United States.

by Rahul Reddy & Emily Neumann

President Obama discussed immigration in an interview with "Face the Nation" host Bob Schieffer, which aired on November 9, 2014. He again confirmed his intention to use his executive authority to act on immigration by the end of the year. Frustration with the lack of congressional action and stubbornness of the opposition in dealing with a system which everyone agrees is broken has motivated the President to take temporary action while the legislative branch works towards a permanent fix.

The President indicated that his action will not include everything that needs to be done and will take time to implement. The three areas that may be addressed by Executive Action include border security, making the current legal system more efficient, and providing a chance for undocumented immigrants with American children to legalize.

“I’d prefer, and still prefer, to see it done through Congress. But every day that I wait, we’re misallocating resources, we’re deporting people that shouldn’t be deported, we’re not deporting folks that are dangerous and need to be deported,” the President said. Although House Speaker John Boehner and Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell have both warned the President against taking action on his own, Mr. Obama reminded them that no one is stopping Congress from acting in parallel. After Congress failed to act for over a year, Mr. Obama holds out hope that a bill can still be passed. If so, he indicated that he will sign it and it will supersede any executive action taken.

While details of the President’s plan remain unknown, any application for benefits will likely require an individual to establish identity, when entry to the United States occurred, and continued physical presence in the country. Steps can be taken now to preserve evidence that might be necessary for documenting that the requirements for relief have been met. The following list of documents may be helpful for this purpose:

·Valid AND/OR Expired Passport, Visa, I-94, any Receipt from USCIS.

·Any Identification Card (Such as Driver License, Identification Card, School ID, etc.).

·School Records (Such as Transcripts, report Card, etc.)

·Medical Records from hospital or doctor visits.

·Lease Agreement

·Utility Bills (such as phone, electricity, gas, cable, internet, etc.).

·Official Records from Religious entity in the USA, such as records of baptisms, weddings, etc.

·Travel Records such as transportation tickets, hotel receipts, etc.

·Money order receipts, vehicle registration, insurance policies, etc.

·Any receipts from Western Union.

·Traffic Tickets.

·Any major purchases like furniture or car repairs.

·bus and air tickets from travel within the U.S.

·Any mail that you received while you have lived in the U.S.

·Hotel stay invoices

·Records from county or city libraries.

The above list is not intended to confirm the possible documents that may help to establish eligibility. Until the President’s plan is announced and the application process is implemented, take care to avoid scams. Follow these tips from the American Immigration Lawyers Association to escape being taken advantage of:

·Do not believe it if someone tells you about a secret new immigration law or claims to have connections or special influence with any government office or agency

·Don’t pay money to someone to refer you to an immigration lawyer

·Walk away if an immigration lawyer doesn’t have a license

·Never sign an application that contains false information, and try not to sign blank forms. If you must sign a blank form, make sure you get a copy of the completed form and check to make sure all the information is correct before it is filed

·Always get proof that your papers have been filed–ask for a copy or government filing receipt whenever anything is submitted in your case Only a licensed lawyer or accredited representative is authorized and qualified to assist with an immigration case. Before paying any money or filing any case, check whether an immigration lawyer is in good standing and licensed by contacting the state bar.

 

Rahul Reddy & Emily Neumann practices business immigration law and are partners in Reddy & Neumann, P.C. in Houston, TX. Neumann writes a blog on immigration law immigrationgirl.com) and shares updates on Twitter (@immigrationgirl) and her Facebook page to help her clients stay informed of the latest news.

 

Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is an immigration law firm in Houston, Texas. For over 15 years, our firm has successfully represented corporate clients across the United States in their efforts to bring foreign workers and business professionals to the United States. Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is dedicated in its advocacy and community involvement efforts towards achieving effective comprehensive immigration policy reform. From filing, through approval, and on to appeal, we do everything possible to ensure that your company can bring the best and brightest in the world to the United States.

The founder and former president of a Bay Area university was sentenced Friday to 198 months in prison for orchestrating a large-scale student visa fraud scheme that generated nearly $6 million in profits which the defendant used to purchase real estate and luxury vehicles.

Susan Xiao-Ping Su, 44, of Pleasanton, appeared in court before U.S. District Court Judge Jon S. Tigar. In addition to the prison term, Judge Tigar ordered Su to forfeit $5.6 million in proceeds generated by the fraud scheme and pay more than $900,000 in restitution. The case is the result of a probe by the multiagency Document and Benefit Fraud Task Force, overseen by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

"Every year our country welcomes academically qualified students from all over the world to learn from our country’s best and brightest," said U.S. Attorney Melinda Haag. "The defendant’s scheme took advantage of this highly valuable immigration process, reducing opportunities for legitimate, worthy student applicants. The conviction and sentence in this case demonstrate our resolve to work closely with HSI to ferret out and bring to justice those who choose to engage in immigration fraud."

In March, following a three-week trial, Su was convicted of 31 counts of wire fraud, mail fraud, conspiracy to commit visa fraud, visa fraud, use of a false document, making false statements to a government agency, alien harboring, unauthorized access to a government computer and money laundering.

"This sentence should leave no doubt that there are serious consequences for those who exploit our legal immigration system for personal gain," said Tatum King, acting special agent in charge for HSI San Francisco. "Student visas are intended to give people from around the world a chance to come to this country to enrich themselves with the vast learning opportunities available here, but in this case the defendant was interested in a different kind of enrichment, her own. Our message is simple – America’s legal immigration system is not for sale and HSI will move aggressively against those who compromise the integrity of that system and put our country’s security at risk simply to turn a profit."

During the trial, evidence showed that Su engaged in a two-year scheme to defraud the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) by submitting fraudulent documents seeking to admit foreign students to Tri-Valley University and, after obtaining DHS approval, fraudulently issuing visa-related documents to foreign students in exchange for "tuition and fees." In the school’s student visa petitions, Su made false claims about the university’s admission and graduation requirements.

Three purported Tri-Valley University professors testified they never authorized Su to use their credentials in connection with the university. Additionally, multiple Tri-Valley University employees testified the university had no requirements for admission or graduation, and that Su routinely instructed staff to fabricate fraudulent transcripts and other university documents.

As part of the scheme, Su also made false representations to DHS through the Student and Exchange Visitor Information System (SEVIS), which the U.S. government uses to monitor the student visa program. Through those false representations, Su was able to unlawfully obtain F-1 visa-related documents regardless of students’ academic qualifications or their course of study. In furtherance of the scheme, Su was also convicted of harboring two Tri-Valley University student-employees to assist her with making the false representations to SEVIS. One of the harbored students testified Su also requested him to paint her house and move furniture.

Su made more than $5.6 million through her operation of the school and engaged in seven money laundering transactions using the proceeds to purchase commercial real estate, a Mercedes Benz car, and multiple residences, including a mansion on the Ruby Hill Golf Club in Pleasanton, each in her name.

The probe began in May 2010 after HSI received a tip about purported irregularities at the university.

The case was prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorneys Wade Rhyne and Hartley West, aided by Noble Hughes, Janice Pagsanjan and Rosario Calderon.

 

Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is an immigration law firm in Houston, Texas. For over 15 years, our firm has successfully represented corporate clients across the United States in their efforts to bring foreign workers and business professionals to the United States. Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is dedicated in its advocacy and community involvement efforts towards achieving effective comprehensive immigration policy reform. From filing, through approval, and on to appeal, we do everything possible to ensure that your company can bring the best and brightest in the world to the United States.