A manager of McLean, Virginia-based Integrated Academics was convicted and sentenced Friday for conspiring to create fraudulent transcripts so foreign students appeared eligible to retain their student visas in the United States. This case was investigated by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), with assistance from the Internal Revenue Service, the Northern Virginia Community College Police Department and Strayer University.

Mohamad Yousef Tellawi, 34, of Falls Church, was sentenced to 22 months in prison, followed by three years of supervised release, for participating in the immigration document fraud conspiracy. Co-conspirators Lea Dzhin, 37, of Falls Church, and Maher Khudari, 28, of Arlington, previously pleaded guilty and were sentenced for their roles in the conspiracy. Tellawi and Dzhin also were ordered to forfeit $265,000 in proceeds from the fraud, and Khudari was ordered to forfeit $30,747.65.

According to court records, Tellawi and Dzhin are managers of Integrated Academics, a company that caters to international students and touts itself as offering a full range of services for students, including securing college admissions and providing academic advising and tutoring.

From about November 2012 to October 2013, Tellawi and Dzhin conspired with Khudari, an admissions official at Strayer University, to fraudulently create at least 58 official Strayer University transcripts in order to help clients of Integrated Academics retain their F-1 non-immigrant student visas and remain in the United States. Tellawi would complete the necessary paperwork containing the fraudulent transcripts and meet with school officials on behalf of Integrated Academics' student clients. In addition, Tellawi and Dzhin would facilitate their clients' continued presence as student visa holders by hiring people to take online classes, write papers and take tests for the clients.

 

Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is an immigration law firm in Houston, Texas. For over 15 years, our firm has successfully represented corporate clients across the United States in their efforts to bring foreign workers and business professionals to the United States. Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is dedicated in its advocacy and community involvement efforts towards achieving effective comprehensive immigration policy reform. From filing, through approval, and on to appeal, we do everything possible to ensure that your company can bring the best and brightest in the world to the United States.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) today announced the launch of the first authorized app to expedite a traveler’s entry process into the United States. Mobile Passport Control (MPC) will allow eligible travelers to submit their passport information and customs declaration form via a smartphone or tablet prior to CBP inspection. This first-of-its-kind app was developed by Airside Mobile and Airports Council International-North America (ACI-NA) in partnership with CBP as part of a pilot program at the Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport. IPhone and iPad users can download the app for free from Apple’s App Store.

“We are strongly committed to the facilitation of travel and tourism to the United States, all while maintaining the highest security standards in the world,” said Deputy Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas. “Mobile Passport Control is an important step and one that we think the traveling public will embrace.”

Eligible travelers arriving at Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport will be able to use the app beginning Aug. 13. MPC is expected to expand to more airports later this year and to Android smartphone users in the future.

“CBP continues to transform the international arrivals experience for travelers by offering new and innovative ways to expedite entry into the United States, while maintaining the highest standards of security” said CBP Commissioner R. Gil Kerlikowske. “By offering this app to passengers, we hope to build upon the success we have already experienced with Automated Passport Control, which has resulted in decreases in wait times as much as 25-40 percent, even with continued growth in international arrivals.”

MPC currently offers U.S. citizens and Canadian visitors a more efficient and secure in-person inspection between the CBP officer and the traveler upon arrival in the United States. Much like Automated Passport Control, the app does not require pre-approval, is free-to-use and does not collect any new information on travelers. As a result, travelers will experience shorter wait times, less congestion and faster processing.

“Mobile Passport exemplifies the forward-thinking commitment CBP and airports have to improving the passenger experience when entering the United States,” said ACI-NA President and CEO Kevin M. Burke. “This partnership between CBP and ACI-NA also represents an outstanding example of industry and government working together to find smart, cost-effective solutions. We look forward to continuing our collaboration with CBP as Mobile Passport begins its roll-out at U.S. airports later this year.”

There are five easy steps to MPC:

- Download the Mobile Passport Control App from the Apple App Store prior to arriving
- Create a profile with your passport information
- Complete the “New Trip” section upon arrival in the United States
- Submit your customs declaration form through the app to receive an electronic receipt with an Encrypted Quick Response  (QR) code. This receipt will expire four hours after being issued
- Bring your passport and smartphone or tablet with your digital bar-coded receipt to a CBP officer

ACI-NA contracted with Airside Mobile in MPC’s technical development. Information about Mobile Passport, including how to download, user eligibility and other frequently asked questions, is available on the Travel section of the CBP.gov website and the Airside Mobile website.

MPC is just one part of CBP’s resource optimization strategy which is transforming the way CBP does business in land, air and sea environments. As part of its commitment to innovation, CBP last year rolled out Automated Passport Control, which is now available in 22 locations, and automated the I-94 form. CBP has also enrolled more than two million travelers in trusted traveler programs such as Global Entry, NEXUS and SENTRI. These programs allow CBP officers to process travelers safely and efficiently while enhancing security and reducing operational costs.

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Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is an immigration law firm in Houston, Texas. For over 15 years, our firm has successfully represented corporate clients across the United States in their efforts to bring foreign workers and business professionals to the United States. Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is highly experienced in working with employment-based visas, adjustment of status, green cards, and PERM labor certification. From filing, through approval, and on to appeal, we do everything possible to ensure that your company can bring the best and brightest in the world to the United States.

A former Jamaican police officer who illegally entered the United States and then became a U.S. citizen and a College Park police officer was sentenced July 8 to ten months in prison for committing immigration fraud. The investigation leading to his sentence was conducted by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement's (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI).

Devon Campbell, aka Wilmott Alvin Livingston, left Jamaica in November 2007 and entered the United States using a Jamaican passport bearing the fabricated name Wilmott Alvin Livingston and a false date of birth.

"For more than a decade, Campbell violated this country's immigration laws and deceived this nation's immigration authorities," said United States Attorney Sally Quillian Yates. "We require honesty and integrity from our police officers, and Campbell's fraud on the immigration system violated this trust."

"The defendant used his fraudulently obtained U.S. citizenship to become a police officer in this country, making a mockery of the very laws he was sworn to uphold," said Brock D. Nicholson, special agent in charge of HSI Atlanta. "U.S. citizenship is eagerly sought by millions of people across the world, and HSI special agents work hard to maintain the integrity of our system by identifying those like Mr. Campbell who seek to gain it through fraud."

According to information presented in court: In 2000, Campbell lived in Jamaica, where he had previously been employed as a police officer with the Jamaican Constabulary Force prior to his fraudulent entry into the United States.

While in the United States, Campbell lived under the Livingston alias. On April 19, 2001, Campbell (using the Livingston alias) married a United States citizen in Jonesboro. Shortly thereafter, Campbell (under the Livingston name) petitioned to become a Lawful Permanent Resident. On Aug. 13, 2004, U.S. immigration authorities granted the application and Campbell (under the Livingston name) became a permanent resident of the United States.

On Oct. 15, 2007, Campbell, using the Livingston name and date of birth, filed an Application for Naturalization with U.S. immigration services. Although the application required Campbell to list any previously-used names, Campbell marked that section with the letters "N/A," meaning "Not Applicable." Campbell also signed the form under penalty of perjury using the fabricated name Wilmott Alvin Livingston. On April 11, 2008, Campbell (under the Livingston alias) became a naturalized U.S. citizen. Later that month, Campbell applied for and was subsequently issued a U.S. passport. On the passport application, Campbell listed his false name and date of birth. Campbell has used his fraudulently-obtained passport to travel back and forth to Jamaica.

Two months after becoming a U.S. citizen, on June 12, 2008, Campbell (under the Livingston identity) and his wife divorced. Eight days later, Campbell (under the Livingston identity) married another woman.

Since 2011, Campbell has served as a police officer with the College Park Police Department. In obtaining his Georgia Peace Officer Standards and Training certification, Campbell falsely claimed to be a naturalized United States citizen and submitted an unlawfully obtained Certificate of Naturalization.

On April 8, 2014, Campbell, 46, of Ellenwood, pleaded guilty to one count of Unlawfully Procuring Citizenship or Naturalization and one count of Using a Passport Secured by False Statements.

As part of his conviction, Campbell's United States citizenship has been revoked. In addition, after completing his prison sentence Campbell will be removed from the United States.

Assistant United States Attorney Jeffrey W. Davis prosecuted the case.

 

Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is an immigration law firm in Houston, Texas. For over 15 years, our firm has successfully represented corporate clients across the United States in their efforts to bring foreign workers and business professionals to the United States. Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is highly experienced in working with employment-based visas, adjustment of status, green cards, and PERM labor certification. From filing, through approval, and on to appeal, we do everything possible to ensure that your company can bring the best and brightest in the world to the United States.

By Adena Bowman, Attorney at Law

 

After entering the country from traveling abroad, you go to access your electronic I-94 online at the Customs and Border Patrol (CBP) website. As you stare at the screen, you realize your I-94 has an error on it, or are completely unable to pull up your I-94 at all.

In previous years, upon entry into the United States you would have been handed your stamped I-94 at the airport. If an error was later discovered on your I-94, you were required to go to your local Deferred Inspection Office and have the I-94 corrected. In April 2013, CBP switched to an electronic system which tracks your travel history and arrival information. Now that CBP has switched to an electronic system, you might assume the correction process would also have been made electronic, with an email address or form to contact CBP to correct the mistake. However, this is not the case.

To date, CBP still requires those who either have errors on their I-94 or who are unable to find the electronic copy of the I-94 to go to their local Deferred Inspection office. There may be alternatives available to avoid going to a Deferred Inspection office. If you have an error on your electronic I-94, or are unable to access your electronic I-94, before going to your local Deferred Inspection Office, contact an attorney to review the specific facts of your case.

 

Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is an immigration law firm in Houston, Texas. For over 15 years, our firm has successfully represented corporate clients across the United States in their efforts to bring foreign workers and business professionals to the United States. Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is highly experienced in working with employment-based visas, adjustment of status, green cards, and PERM labor certification. From filing, through approval, and on to appeal, we do everything possible to ensure that your company can bring the best and brightest in the world to the United States.