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TN NAFTA Professionals

The North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) created special economic and trade relationships for the United States, Canada and Mexico and authorized nonimmigrant NAFTA Professional (TN) visas for citizens of Canada and Mexico to work in the United States as NAFTA professionals. This visa status is available only for specific professional occupations and only to citizens of Mexico and Canada.

TN visas are issued for three years, and can be renewed. An advantage of both the TN visa is that an application can be made at the port of entry or consulate rather than with the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. This can save time and money when you need to hire a worker quickly.

Employer Compliance

At REDDY & NEUMANN, P.C., we are well equipped to handle all of your compliance issues.  Some of the services we provide in this area include:

  1. Updated LCA submissions when H-1B employees change work locations.  If your H-1B employee’s work site will be changing, a new LCA is usually required. We can obtain a new LCA for you and provide instructions for updating your Public Access File.
  2. Representation during Wage and Hour Investigations. If your company has received a letter from the U.S. Department of Labor, Wage and Hour Division regarding a possible H-1B Investigation, we can represent your company in order to help limit your potential liability.
  3. Internal Auditing of your current public access information to ensure compliance, remedy any issues, and advise on preventative best practices and procedures so as to avoid any future compliance issues.
  4. Internal Auditing of your current I-9 Forms will ensure compliance and help educate you on the proper procedures to be followed when a new employee is hired.
  5. Creation and Retention of a Public Access files.
  6. Consultation on material changes in employment and the immigration consequences of mergers and acquisitions.
  7. Consultation regarding E-Verify and the procedures to follow in order to confirm employment eligibility of new hires.                                                                                                                                   OnlineCasinos

Family Visa

Relatives of US citizens and legal permanent residents may be eligible for family-based visa classification. Reddy & Neumann, P.C. is well-equipped to assist with petitions for immediate relatives of United States citizens and aliens eligible for preferential consideration based on a familial relationship to a citizen or legal permanent resident of the U.S.

 

1. Family of U. S. Citizens
A U.S. citizen may petition for certain family members to receive a green card, a fiancée visa or a K-3/K-4 Visa based on your relationship.

 

Table: Relatives for Whom a U.S. Citizen May Petition 

Type of Relative for Whom You May   Petition

Immigration Benefit

Spouse

 

Children (unmarried and under 21)

 

Sons and daughters (married and/or 21 or over)

 

Parents, if you are 21 or over

 

Siblings, if you are 21 or over

Green Card (Permanent Residence)

A fiancé(e) residing outside the United States and children of fiancé(e) under 21

Fiancé(e) Visa

Spouse

 

Children of spouse (unmarried and under 21)

K-3/K-4 Nonimmigrant Visa

 

 

Application Process: Green Card (Permanent Residence)
To petition for a family member to receive a green card (permanent residence), the following must be submitted:

  • Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative
  • Proof of your U.S. citizenship
  • Evidence of the qualifying relationship (birth certificate, marriage certificate, divorce decree, etc.)
  • Proof of any legal name change for you or the beneficiary
  • Spouses of deceased U.S. permanent residents (widows and widowers) may also be eligible to become permanent residents.

Immediate Relatives
The term “immediate relative(s)” is used to define certain immigrant relatives of U.S. citizens. Immediate relatives include:

  • Spouses of U.S. citizens
  • Children (unmarried and under 21) of U.S. citizens
  • Parents of U.S. citizens (The petitioning citizen must be 21 or older.)

For immediate relatives of U.S. citizens, visas are always available, which means that a family member does not need to wait in line for a visa. Immediate relatives who are in the United States can file Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status at the same time as Form I-130.

 

Preference Categories
Preference categories apply to family members who are not immediate relatives. The visas allotted for these categories are subject to annual numerical limits. A visa becomes available to a preference category based on the priority date (the date the Form I-130 was filed). Preference categories are grouped as follows:

  • First preference: Unmarried, adult sons and daughters of U.S. citizens (adult means 21 or older.)
  • Second Preference (2A): Spouses of green card holders, unmarried children (under 21) of permanent residents
  • Second Preference (2B): Unmarried adult sons and daughters of permanent residents
  • Third Preference: Married sons and daughters (any age) of U.S. citizens
  • Fourth Preference: Brothers and sisters of adult U.S. citizens

 

What Happens Next?
If a relative is already in the United States, he or she may apply to adjust status to become a green card holder (permanent resident) after a visa number becomes available using Form I-485.


If a relative is outside of the United States, your petition will be sent to the National Visa Center (NVC). The NVC will forward your petition to the appropriate U.S. consulate when a visa becomes available and your relative will be notified about how to proceed. This process is referred to as “Consular Processing.”


A family member’s preference category will determine how long he or she will have to wait for an immigrant visa number. Once you have filed a petition, you can check its progress the “My Case Status” page. For visa availability information, see the “Visa Bulletin” page on the U.S. Department of State website.


NOTE: A visa petition (Form I-130 or Form I-129F) is only used to demonstrate a qualifying relationship. An approved petition DOES NOT grant any benefit, it simply creates a place in line for visa processing.

 

2. Family of Green Card (Permanent Residents)

A green card holder (permanent resident) may petition for certain family members to immigrate to the United States as permanent residents.

 

Green Card Holders (Permanent Residents) May Petition For The Following Family Members:

  • Spouse (husband or wife)
  • Unmarried children under 21
  • Unmarried son or daughter of any age

 

Application Process
To obtain a green card for your family member, you must:

  • File Form I-130, Petition for Alien Relative.
  • Provide proof of your status to demonstrate that you are a permanent resident.
  • Submit evidence of the qualifying relationship such as a birth certificate, marriage certificate, divorce decree, etc. See the form instructions for specific documents required.
  • Submit proof of any legal name change for you or your family member (the beneficiary).

Preference Categories
When petitioning for your relative, the following preference categories apply:

  • First preference: Unmarried, adult sons and daughters of U.S. citizens. (Adult means 21 or older)
  • Second Preference (2A): Spouses of green card holders, unmarried children (under 21) of permanent residents
  • Second Preference (2B): Unmarried adult sons and daughters of permanent residents
  • Third Preference: Married sons and daughters (any age) of U.S. citizens
  • Fourth Preference: Brothers and sisters of adult U.S. citizens

A visa becomes available to a preference category according to the priority date (the date the I-130 was properly filed).

 

What Happens Next?
If your relative is already in the United States legally, he or she may apply to adjust status to become a permanent resident after a visa number becomes available using Form I-485, Application to Register Permanent Residence or Adjust Status.


If your relative is outside the United States, your petition will be sent to the National Visa Center (NVC). The NVC will forward your petition to the appropriate U.S. consulate when a visa becomes available and your relative will be notified about how to proceed. This process is referred to as “Consular Processing.”


Your family member’s preference category will determine how long he or she will have to wait for an immigrant visa number.


Note: A visa petition (Form I-130) is only used to demonstrate a qualifying relationship. An approved petition DOES NOT grant any benefit except to create a place in line for visa processing.

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